Discussion:
a very very LHC?
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RichD
2018-02-15 18:15:53 UTC
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It's conceivable to build an accelerator which
circumnavigates the globe; 24000 miles, perhaps a
200 year project.

The question then is, would there be any point?
What new phenomena might occur, what theory could be tested?

Of course, we can't tell, till it's done. String
theory tests would still be far out of reach, but
other speculations, in the theoretical community,
of what might pop up, so to speak?

--
Rich
Alan Folmsbee
2018-02-16 23:30:51 UTC
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Post by RichD
It's conceivable to build an accelerator which
circumnavigates the globe; 24000 miles, perhaps a
200 year project.
The question then is, would there be any point?
What new phenomena might occur, what theory could be tested?
Of course, we can't tell, till it's done. String
theory tests would still be far out of reach, but
other speculations, in the theoretical community,
of what might pop up, so to speak?
--
Rich
Colliders should provide better evidence of electron fields
being only for macro scale, but paired electron-proton flows
at femto scales.

One such experiment would try to get one proton at attract five electrons
while repelling three protons. That isolation may not be possible if pairing
theory is right.

LHC is for energy centric worship. Energy is not all its cracked up
to be. The momentum of free space should be detected in a very very LHC.
Steve BH
2018-02-16 23:37:58 UTC
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Post by RichD
It's conceivable to build an accelerator which
circumnavigates the globe; 24000 miles, perhaps a
200 year project.
The question then is, would there be any point?
What new phenomena might occur, what theory could be tested?
Of course, we can't tell, till it's done. String
theory tests would still be far out of reach, but
other speculations, in the theoretical community,
of what might pop up, so to speak?
--
Rich
You don't want this at the equator, but over near the poles for maximal land. Bering strait, North America, South America, across to the Philippines and up the east coast of China and the USSR. Some water is unavoidable to and from the Antarctic and over the US Gulf (route goes through Havana), but not too bad.
Tom Roberts
2018-02-17 06:17:21 UTC
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Post by RichD
It's conceivable to build an accelerator which
circumnavigates the globe; 24000 miles, perhaps a
200 year project.
Conceivable, but not feasible. Not only economics prevents it, there is
probably not enough Niobium on earth for its magnets (or even copper and
iron), and earthquakes around the globe would probably prevent it from
ever all being operational at once. Not to mention the impossibility of
building such a precision machine over (or under) oceans.
Post by RichD
The question then is, would there be any point?
What new phenomena might occur, what theory could be tested?
There are two related efforts underway to consider potential future
colliders, which definitely include investigating your questions:
* The Very Large Hadron Collider
* The Future Circular Collider project
I am not up to date on these, and they might have merged (or possibly
the former morphed into the latter). It's been over a year since I have
seen any announcements about the VLHC, but the FCC held a meeting and
colloquium at Fermilab a few weeks ago (I attended neither).

Tom Roberts
Steve BH
2018-02-18 03:20:43 UTC
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There is room for at least one more generation around the present site, using the LHC as injector. Increase radius and thus energy by 5. More if magnets improve.
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